Photography Essentials by Kent Weakley Blog » Photography Tips, Tutorials, How To, Inspiration

Masthead header

Video Photo Tip ~ How Many Photos Has My Camera Taken?

Video Photo Tip ~ How Many Photos Has My Camera Taken?


Video Photo Tip ~ How Many Photos Has My Camera Taken?

Have you ever wondered how many photos your camera has taken? Or have you ever sold or bought a camera and asked how many photos have been taken with that camera? Some cameras do have that info in the menu screens, but many don’t. Here’s how you can tell.

This website allows you to load one of your images. Click here to get started. Be patient, it can take a long time for the metadata from the file to pop up. It’s well worth the wait, as you’ll see data you never dreamed of. Once it appears, scroll down and look for “Shutter Count”. If you’re shooting with a Canon, look for the “File Index” number. There you have it. That is the number of photos captured by that camera when that image was shot.

There are also some free software downloads that do similar tasks. Check them out here and here.

Photo Tip ~ If you have a photo tip or would like to have a photo question answered, send me an email. Be sure to subscribe for free to this blog to receive ongoing great photo tips and inspiration! If this was helpful, please leave a comment.

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Not a single “um” in that video. ;) (unlike someone i know.)

Good info to know!

[Reply]

Great tip Kent!

[Reply]

Sweet! Didn’t know that. I’m guessing you can get the exif data using other utilities too, which would be helpful if you were somewhere buying a used camera and didn’t have access to the internet.

[Reply]

Amazing! I thought I knew about the EXIF data … but I didn’t know this! Photoshop shows it, and so does Nikon Capture, but only a bit it would seem.

This shows masses more, and I don’t understand a quarter of it! Thanks, Kent, for pointing out this one.

[Reply]

I’ve used several of these exif viewers and the one I tend to come back to always is PhotoME. Its free and gives you more than you might want to know. The only problem is that it gives you so much, you might not be able to find what you actually want.

Have a look here: http://www.photome.de/ (PC only unfortunately)

[Reply]

Phil Resta

I tried several photo’s, but there is never a “shutter count” in the results. There is a “file index” which numbers the photograph much like a film camera does frames, but it does not show how many times the shutter was released.

[Reply]

Interesting. Are these the original files from the camera? If so, what camera are they from?

[Reply]

Thanks a lot for the video. Very useful!

[Reply]

Luke

Cool tip and site…although I couldnt find the shutter count on a camera I just purchased used myself (lumix g2) from photos I had taken.

[Reply]

Olly

I’ve just tried this for both a brand new 7D and a year old 5DMkii and neither show the shutter count or indeed any numbers that may indicate the shutter count is listed under a different value.

Which is a bit frustrating as of all of the info available, finding out the shutter count is what brought me here..

[Reply]

Shoot a small size jpg and email it to me. I will be glad to try and find the info for you.

[Reply]

Cool blog! I dont think Ive seen all the angles of this subject the way youve pointed them out. Youre a true star, a rock star man. Youve got so much to say and have a lot of knowledge about the subject that I think you should just teach a class about it HaHa!

[Reply]

This would be really cool if it worked for the 5D Mk II. It does give a lot of other neat info besides the missing shutter count though.

[Reply]

Send me a .jpg from the camera. I’ll see what I can find. Thanks.

[Reply]

Egidio Leitao

If you are looking at a file that’s been edited (e.g., via Photoshop Elements), then the shutter count is not displayed. I also had the same problem when I looked at edited photos. Once I checked an original file, the count was there.

[Reply]

It is possible for various applications to strip out the metadata from an image. The original files should still maintain that data.

[Reply]

Cassandra Doyle

I currently have a Nikon d80 with a 50mm/f1.8 lens. I am happy with the lens, but I really want to be able to go really close up for baby features (eyes, hands, feet, etc.) and children’s portraits like this photographer: http://www.anecaphotography.ca. And when I say close I would like the capability of being able to focus on a baby’s lips and see individual spit bubbles kind-of-detail.

Please help! do I need a macro lens, or what kind of lens can help me do this?

[Reply]

I shoot with the 60mm and 105mm Nikon macro lens. The 60mm is great for close up postage stamp details and the 105mm gives me good macro detail while allowing me to be back a bit from the subject. They’re both great, I think the 105mm would be good for what you’re talking about. Try renting one and experimenting first.

[Reply]

Ray Rochelle

Thnks for your website for the shutter counts. Appreciate it.
Ray

[Reply]

Thanks for the good info. You are correct, It gives you more than you need to know.

[Reply]

Marv

Thanks for the tips. I tried to read the image that I taken using my old Nikon D70 and for some reason it didn’t show the shutter clicks/counts. Am I missing something ? Thanks

[Reply]

Marv

Btw, I read the previous comment before and I know now why it didn’t show because I didn’t upload the original file, the photoshopped file doesn’t work if you want to see shutter clicks. Thanks a bunch. I got it now :)

[Reply]

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*